Roots and how to maximize root size?

300dutchman

Active member
Fine sir! the Canna organic nutrients are ferments. make your own ferments, save money.
i tried my own recipe in the summer, i ran into some ph issues though, i was up to 8.3 so i added a few lemons which seemed to help, i used wood ash, sheep manure, glaicial dust, bone meal, blood meal, humic acid, and lime.
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
i tried my own recipe in the summer, i ran into some ph issues though, i was up to 8.3 so i added a few lemons which seemed to help, i used wood ash, sheep manure, glaicial dust, bone meal, blood meal, humic acid, and lime.
that wood ash is like, the most basic caustic stuff commonly created in the home! and the lime is super basic too! the lemon juice was a good decision. I very much suggest if you want to blend more, cut the wood ash, and run it through a worm bin after tis done its 2-3 weeks of warm/hot composting. Worms will take all that fertilizer, and make it readily available to the plants. look up Clackamas Coot's interviews, and his old forum posts, both as coot and lumperdawgz, to find really good links to worm composting resources.

Put the wood ash in the compost bin, and let it go through the full cycle of composting. it will help to basic up the Acidic environment of controlled decay.

I would get away from the bone and blood meals if I were you, mainly because scavengers will dig in your pots if it didn't fully compost. also, I don't think I would want to ferment those for liquid fertilizer. it would smell like rotting animals.

I mean the Korean natural farming stuff you see people talking about on the organic side of instagram and youtube. Kale, Apple, Banana(NPK all purpose blend) chopped up, mixed with enough brown sugar to pull the juices out, some pickling bacteria added, and allowed to ferment like wine grapes for a month or 2., strain, add molasses to make shelf stable. put the solids in the compost bin or bury in the garden. I basically followed the recipes on the Unconventional farmer website, modified with some of the Korean natural farming recipe methods. The Canna Organic fertilizers are ferments w/ added minerals. you can make 2-3(juicier fruit =more liquid) gallons of veg, bloom, or all purpose for under 20 dollars by learning to ferment.

You can do this with the dried kelp, and alfalfa meals too. you rehydrate them, mix an equal weight sugar, ferment and strain.

you can grow plants like comfrey, and stinging nettle in the high mineral soil you made, ferment those, and make some of the most wonderfully potent liquid homemade fertilizers on the planet. the only thing you could add to the food for the fertilizer crop is kelp. the sea kelp makes the comfrey and nettles have their full spectrum of fertilizer potential, where as you might have to wait a year or 2 for the glacial rock dust to be fully plant available.
 

300dutchman

Active member
that wood ash is like, the most basic caustic stuff commonly created in the home! and the lime is super basic too! the lemon juice was a good decision. I very much suggest if you want to blend more, cut the wood ash, and run it through a worm bin after tis done its 2-3 weeks of warm/hot composting. Worms will take all that fertilizer, and make it readily available to the plants. look up Clackamas Coot's interviews, and his old forum posts, both as coot and lumperdawgz, to find really good links to worm composting resources.

Put the wood ash in the compost bin, and let it go through the full cycle of composting. it will help to basic up the Acidic environment of controlled decay.

I would get away from the bone and blood meals if I were you, mainly because scavengers will dig in your pots if it didn't fully compost. also, I don't think I would want to ferment those for liquid fertilizer. it would smell like rotting animals.

I mean the Korean natural farming stuff you see people talking about on the organic side of instagram and youtube. Kale, Apple, Banana(NPK all purpose blend) chopped up, mixed with enough brown sugar to pull the juices out, some pickling bacteria added, and allowed to ferment like wine grapes for a month or 2., strain, add molasses to make shelf stable. put the solids in the compost bin or bury in the garden. I basically followed the recipes on the Unconventional farmer website, modified with some of the Korean natural farming recipe methods. The Canna Organic fertilizers are ferments w/ added minerals. you can make 2-3(juicier fruit =more liquid) gallons of veg, bloom, or all purpose for under 20 dollars by learning to ferment.

You can do this with the dried kelp, and alfalfa meals too. you rehydrate them, mix an equal weight sugar, ferment and strain.

you can grow plants like comfrey, and stinging nettle in the high mineral soil you made, ferment those, and make some of the most wonderfully potent liquid homemade fertilizers on the planet. the only thing you could add to the food for the fertilizer crop is kelp. the sea kelp makes the comfrey and nettles have their full spectrum of fertilizer potential, where as you might have to wait a year or 2 for the glacial rock dust to be fully plant available.
excellent post, thank you so much for this, i have two 55 gallon drums ready to go, i also have a 15yr old compost pile i add to daily, i have alot of whiteflies and fungus gnats in the compost pile, so i do not use it anywhere, i had thought about adding nematodes to the compost pile in hopes of controlling the bugs.
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
excellent post, thank you so much for this, i have two 55 gallon drums ready to go, i also have a 15yr old compost pile i add to daily, i have alot of whiteflies and fungus gnats in the compost pile, so i do not use it anywhere, i had thought about adding nematodes to the compost pile in hopes of controlling the bugs.
your welcome!!
I am iffy on adding multicellular friends to the compost pile. it sometimes can get very hot in there! if you have a slab of concrete or asphalt, you can bag up compost in black garbage bags, and seal them up and set them on the concrete in the summer to sterilize it of most pests. if you have black 55 gallon drums like the big ole pickle barrels, and the lids, those work as good as plastic bags.
you may want to add some wood chips or fresh bio char type charcoal to your compost pile to tie up nitrogen. pests exist because they have food to exploit, and their numbers are so high because they have minimal predation pressure. I've never dealt with whiteflies so i won't tell you how to kill them. as I've never learned how.
 

budkeeper

Member
Indi & all,
I've had my best root balls using airpots. They work quite well. However, passive hydro is my grow of choice for flowering. I will use airpots for vegetation. Also, it was mentioned about salts. Definition of a salt is the residue left from an acid/base reaction. That being said, non-organic growers must get a reliable and not cheap pH meter as well as a ppm indicator for consistent success. Happy growing!- šŸ˜Ž bk
 

300dutchman

Active member
your welcome!!
I am iffy on adding multicellular friends to the compost pile. it sometimes can get very hot in there! if you have a slab of concrete or asphalt, you can bag up compost in black garbage bags, and seal them up and set them on the concrete in the summer to sterilize it of most pests. if you have black 55 gallon drums like the big ole pickle barrels, and the lids, those work as good as plastic bags.
you may want to add some wood chips or fresh bio char type charcoal to your compost pile to tie up nitrogen. pests exist because they have food to exploit, and their numbers are so high because they have minimal predation pressure. I've never dealt with whiteflies so i won't tell you how to kill them. as I've never learned how.
now i really like that idea, it never occured to me to sterilize the compost, i will be digging up my pile, about 3 yards worth and give it a try, i burn wood for heat 5 months a year hear i dump all my ash and charcoal into my compost, i even had morels growing out of my compost and i have never eaten a morel in my life so as to how it got there is beyond me. my compost receives twice a year dose of 200 gallons of seaweed, it used to be bull kelp but we have a invasion of sea urchin eating all the kelp roots, i add 20-40 salmon carcasses, all sorts of fruit and veg scraps, the potatos we get are so creamy lol. right on for sharing this doing me a solid.
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
now i really like that idea, it never occured to me to sterilize the compost, i will be digging up my pile, about 3 yards worth and give it a try, i burn wood for heat 5 months a year hear i dump all my ash and charcoal into my compost, i even had morels growing out of my compost and i have never eaten a morel in my life so as to how it got there is beyond me. my compost receives twice a year dose of 200 gallons of seaweed, it used to be bull kelp but we have a invasion of sea urchin eating all the kelp roots, i add 20-40 salmon carcasses, all sorts of fruit and veg scraps, the potatos we get are so creamy lol. right on for sharing this doing me a solid.
your welcome! I learn so much just talking to people at the garden centers. not employees, but customers. specifically elderly ladies.
I love that you have a hardcore composting system, and am sad that you are dealing with invasive species. have you seen that kid on social media and youtube that goes beach shrimping and picks parasites off the shrimpos and composts the parasites? so, if you are an industrious person, you could get with the guys farming kelp, and get them to catch the urchins, if edible, sell meat and roe(eggs) and compost those chitinous carcasses so as to make the compost more inhospitable to pests! or ferment the entire urchin into fertilizer to sell if they are inedible. there is fish hydrolysate, and crab hydrolysate, why not urchin hydrolysate. sounds like the best protein w/ micronutrient the plants could get!!!
The morel's blew in on the wind from having fruited somewhere nearby!!
 
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