indoor grow

300dutchman

Active member
end of preflower and i figure they are in week two of flower, master kush front left, back left is afghan kush, right side is what i had thought was a nevilles haze i pollinated in the summer with a male from the 18 seeds i got. fungus gnats and thrips are a issue this round. i have crysopa showing up this week and some nematodes. i used gai green soil and the gai green powder fert, the veg period went well but once the hps bulbs went in and the gai green bloom food has been applied they are not doing as well, the bugs have really taken a toll as well, they literally suck the life out the plant. any suggestions as to how to control the bugs with spending less, those crysopa are not cheap.
 

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musashi

Site Moderator
Staff member
Lots of solutions to be found using the search function including spinosad, neem, flypaper and tanglefoot, temperature and humidity, overwatering, ventilation, etc.

🤙Mu
 

300dutchman

Active member
spinosad is a new one, neem is not a option where i live as it is illegal, i do have yellow sticky pads in place, i will have to lookup tanglefoot. i have managed to keep the humidity at 39-50%, my temperature runs form 18-22 dgr, i am prone to overwatering, they seem to be thirsty during veg but not so much during the flower stage. i use nematodes on a regular basis, i was going to try a nematode spray and see if that helps. my ventilation is a inlet fan 6" and a exhaust fan of 6" with a cfm 0f 450 cubic feet, my room is 8feet long almost 7 feet wide and 6-6" tall.
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
so, 300 dutchman. depending on the kinds of thrips you have, you are either gonna have the easiest time in the world, or like what the west cost of north America dealt this past season, a pain in the ass. I am lucky and have weak ass thrips around here, and the 2 times I have gotten them it was the easiest pest problem to deal with. once they came in on the space queen cutting I was gifted years ago, then this past year from some soil from a local store.

With the spinosad applications, you need to spray every 72 hours for atleast 21 days and make sure to saturate the plant, and drench the top inch or 2 of soil each time. thrip larvae live in the leaves, adults in the soil neem oil wouldn't really work on them as its not actually translaminar. a nematode spray is equally as wasteful, as they wont be able to eat the larvae, and will likely desiccate before killing an adult thrip it landed on. keep on drenching. Tanglefoot is less helpful than you would think for thrips. great for beetles and caterpillars though.

once you have beaten the thrips you can focus the gnats.

Gnats are easy to kill, but often get reintroduced in home and commercial gardens just because they are literally everywhere there is damp ground. they are one of the largest nuisance level pests in the greenhouse industry around the world. You get the yellow sticky traps, and hang them on your plants branches a few inches above the soil. you take a small 4 -8 ounce cup or jar and fill it with Apple cider vinegar(most effective) and a couple drops of soap you have green unscented palmolive soap(best to use IMO) underneath the sticky trap. the vinegar off gasses, attracts gnats. gnats get stuck to trap because they fly all weird, and the ones that go in for vinegar drown because the soap broke the waters surface tension, and smother's them. Xantham Gum(T drops) can also decimate and almost fully eradicate the gnat problem, but may( probably will) kill your beneficial micro worms(nematodes) and arthropods. There is a species of bactreria related to the ones in mosquito dunks, that works on fungus gnats. one of the brands is called microbelift I think.

since you said In Deach's thread how you have an organic soil blend, you can add so many badass little soldiers to your Integrated pest management army, that you wont need traps and sprays! If you are in the Midwest of the United states, order from a website called arbico organics. they have insects called Rove beetles, and predatory soil mites called stratiolepsis scimitus(formerly hypoapsis miles) that will eat all kinds of things. I use the stratiolepsis, the nematode 3 pack they sell, and a few other generalist predators in my lawn to harass fleas, ticks, and grub making beetles away so there is less pressure from those pests as I dislike spraying pesticides. My dog who passed a few years ago, was a grass eater, and he used to have occasional seizures. until we stopped putting down pesticides for grubs and then fleas. My boy lived 18 years because he had a pesticide free salad everyday for the last 12 years of his life lol

I believe you also said you brought plants indoors from outdoors. that's generally what we in the pest prevention game call, um, what's the term,.....a sure sign of a bad time. you just took all the pest/parasite organisms that were sheltering on or in your plants roots away from roaming predatory insects, and all kinds of disease pressure they deal with outside. making you the pressure on the pests.
 

quinxstar

Well-known member
your temperature must be too high and you have not enough humidity spray black soap on the leaves
 

axiom

Active member
I have a great solution to your bug problems.
Mosquito Bits
I use this in my indoor worm beds when on occasion I bring in a few fly larvae in the compost I feed the worms.
You really should try it.
Not a chemical but a biological. 👍🤔
It kills the larvae before they can emerge.
If it won’t hurt an earth worm then you’re safe too.
Sold at most hardware stores.
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
I have a great solution to your bug problems.
Mosquito Bits
I use this in my indoor worm beds when on occasion I bring in a few fly larvae in the compost I feed the worms.
You really should try it.
Not a chemical but a biological. 👍🤔
It kills the larvae before they can emerge.
If it won’t hurt an earth worm then you’re safe too.
Sold at most hardware stores.
I am an unlucky human and have limited success with only the mosquito bits for gnats. I've literally done everything, even switched to hydro for awhile,, and there are too many outside my house for them to not be a problem w/o introduced predatory arthropod and nematode, or pesticide pressure. IPM is a brutal game, and we must always choose the most biological path as you said. spinosad is a bacterial extract though. and xantham gum is a food additive. so they are lower on the pyramid than many other pesticide choices. I would put them roughly 2 steps above neem oil, 5 steps below pyrethrins, 10 steps below synthetic pesticide, 15 below systemic pesticides, the top of the pyramid, a place no person should ever go. and after that you need to have a license to purchase anything meaner, the very pinnacle of the pyramid. My neighbor went to school for agriculture. worked on his dads farm in the spring and summer, factory in the winter. He is certified to spray so many things, for all kinds of pests, all the way up to rodents; that I don't wonder why farmers have higher incidences of health problems in old age than the general population.
 

300dutchman

Active member
so, 300 dutchman. depending on the kinds of thrips you have, you are either gonna have the easiest time in the world, or like what the west cost of north America dealt this past season, a pain in the ass. I am lucky and have weak ass thrips around here, and the 2 times I have gotten them it was the easiest pest problem to deal with. once they came in on the space queen cutting I was gifted years ago, then this past year from some soil from a local store.

With the spinosad applications, you need to spray every 72 hours for atleast 21 days and make sure to saturate the plant, and drench the top inch or 2 of soil each time. thrip larvae live in the leaves, adults in the soil neem oil wouldn't really work on them as its not actually translaminar. a nematode spray is equally as wasteful, as they wont be able to eat the larvae, and will likely desiccate before killing an adult thrip it landed on. keep on drenching. Tanglefoot is less helpful than you would think for thrips. great for beetles and caterpillars though.

once you have beaten the thrips you can focus the gnats.

Gnats are easy to kill, but often get reintroduced in home and commercial gardens just because they are literally everywhere there is damp ground. they are one of the largest nuisance level pests in the greenhouse industry around the world. You get the yellow sticky traps, and hang them on your plants branches a few inches above the soil. you take a small 4 -8 ounce cup or jar and fill it with Apple cider vinegar(most effective) and a couple drops of soap you have green unscented palmolive soap(best to use IMO) underneath the sticky trap. the vinegar off gasses, attracts gnats. gnats get stuck to trap because they fly all weird, and the ones that go in for vinegar drown because the soap broke the waters surface tension, and smother's them. Xantham Gum(T drops) can also decimate and almost fully eradicate the gnat problem, but may( probably will) kill your beneficial micro worms(nematodes) and arthropods. There is a species of bactreria related to the ones in mosquito dunks, that works on fungus gnats. one of the brands is called microbelift I think.

since you said In Deach's thread how you have an organic soil blend, you can add so many badass little soldiers to your Integrated pest management army, that you wont need traps and sprays! If you are in the Midwest of the United states, order from a website called arbico organics. they have insects called Rove beetles, and predatory soil mites called stratiolepsis scimitus(formerly hypoapsis miles) that will eat all kinds of things. I use the stratiolepsis, the nematode 3 pack they sell, and a few other generalist predators in my lawn to harass fleas, ticks, and grub making beetles away so there is less pressure from those pests as I dislike spraying pesticides. My dog who passed a few years ago, was a grass eater, and he used to have occasional seizures. until we stopped putting down pesticides for grubs and then fleas. My boy lived 18 years because he had a pesticide free salad everyday for the last 12 years of his life lol

I believe you also said you brought plants indoors from outdoors. that's generally what we in the pest prevention game call, um, what's the term,.....a sure sign of a bad time. you just took all the pest/parasite organisms that were sheltering on or in your plants roots away from roaming predatory insects, and all kinds of disease pressure they deal with outside. making you the pressure on the pests.
oh man this is awesome info you are to kind to take the time to write this, i have used hypoaspis in the past with good results. i agree with using no sprays i have used them in the past but it has been years since i have, it was homemade garlic and chili pepper sprays, i have used a product called jaks or jakes once before with good results at first it worked well for p.m but not so good for thrips or fungus gnats, worked good on mites to. i will certainly be smarter when it comes to the cross contamination between the outdoor and indoor environment. i live on the west coast of canada almost as far west as you can get, lots of humidity lots of mold spores lol outdoor shows here are a complete crap shoot, but when its a season that co operates the harvests are very good, i love my outdoor. here are some shots of this past summer. they were harvested over a period of three weeks, starting september to mid october.
 

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quinxstar

Well-known member
As an insecticide, black soap is effective against aphids, mealybugs, thrips, red spiders. It can be used all year round on all kinds of plants: annuals and perennials, roses, shrubs, trees

black soap must be sprayed on the leaves above and below
 

longball

Well-known member
A@quinxstar, "As an insecticide, black soap is effective against aphids, mealybugs, thrips, red spiders. It can be used all year round on all kinds of plants: annuals and perennials, roses, shrubs, trees black soap must be sprayed on the leaves above and below"

Hello quinxstar!

Do you use the black soap straight up or do you mix it with water? Can you use it on flowers?

Longball
 

quinxstar

Well-known member
A@quinxstar, "As an insecticide, black soap is effective against aphids, mealybugs, thrips, red spiders. It can be used all year round on all kinds of plants: annuals and perennials, roses, shrubs, trees black soap must be sprayed on the leaves above and below"

Hello quinxstar!

Do you use the black soap straight up or do you mix it with water? Can you use it on flowers?

Longball

a cap of black soap in the sprayer filled with water

you can use on flowers but will need to rinse with clear water before cutting
 

MImedpatient

Well-known member
a cap of black soap in the sprayer filled with water

you can use on flowers but will need to rinse with clear water before cutting
A@quinxstar, "As an insecticide, black soap is effective against aphids, mealybugs, thrips, red spiders. It can be used all year round on all kinds of plants: annuals and perennials, roses, shrubs, trees black soap must be sprayed on the leaves above and below"

Hello quinxstar!

Do you use the black soap straight up or do you mix it with water? Can you use it on flowers?

Longball
Make sure to listen to Quinxstar. overuse of an oil based product is not good, ive killed out some of the more soft petaled flowers in my ornamental beds doing that. canola oil to be specific. I read a cup instead of a cap my 1st use when someone posted it on a general gardening forum. bad times man, bad times.

oh man this is awesome info you are to kind to take the time to write this, i have used hypoaspis in the past with good results. i agree with using no sprays i have used them in the past but it has been years since i have, it was homemade garlic and chili pepper sprays, i have used a product called jaks or jakes once before with good results at first it worked well for p.m but not so good for thrips or fungus gnats, worked good on mites to. i will certainly be smarter when it comes to the cross contamination between the outdoor and indoor environment. i live on the west coast of canada almost as far west as you can get, lots of humidity lots of mold spores lol outdoor shows here are a complete crap shoot, but when its a season that co operates the harvests are very good, i love my outdoor. here are some shots of this past summer. they were harvested over a period of three weeks, starting September to mid october.
Your welcome! I've had to deal with so many nuisance level pests I have become quite the arthropod assassin. and passing on the knowledge to all is important. and I love helping everyone get as efficient as possible. to Quote the character Wayne, from the show Letterkenny "If you can be one thing, it's efficient."

You live in the Pacific Northwest. you, should be able to find some older local varieties that giggle at the molds and mildews outside if you participate in the local scene. Friesland and erdpurt and Purple Indica, Romulan, and C99 come to mind. I am always eyeballing stuff meant for the Canadian outdoor because I can literally ride my bike to Canada and many of the Canadian breeders are listing latitudes of outdoor growth and most of them are the same or more north than me.
If you can slap together an Hoop house greenhouse, and run a power line to it, you can run a grow light, and a run of exhaust pipe from your wood stove, to the greenhouse for day extension and heating the place up. you just run the pipe long ways through the greenhouse center, or T it off to go down the sides. you literally only need to get 14-16 hours of light a day, and instead of having a timer, you get the light sensor so as soon as the sun goes down enough, the light kicks on for a few hours. or, if you are a fancy man who plans, you set the timer to run from 6 am till about the time the sun shines, and then at about the time the sun starts setting for x amount of hours. If you were choosing to grow autoflowers this way, you could in theory pop an early crop right as the photoperiods around them are starting to feel the summer, and the space mad from harvesting the autos would be filled by stretching photoperiods. And if you do the hoop house out pvc, you can make it bigger at the end of season, and keep your plants dryer w/ clear plastic above and running a couple oscillating fans among them. It sounds silly, but It can work quite well.

I am going to be putting up an A frame greenhouse made of 4x4s and 2x4s for my veggies. I am going to get some of the white spectrum solar yard lights that have the stays on after dark setting. so I can just have enough boosted light early in the year to jump start the tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers. The brand I have for playing w/ my dog at night have that setting, and it is 4-6 hours of light each night on that setting per light. you could also use those for cannabis greenhouse lighting for that early season jump start. maybe not more heat, but a few extra hours of being awake could be really helpful for getting the plants bigger.

i very much want to get an outdoor going, but city ordinance requires I have a privacy fence, and having the plants enclosed. that requires a fence(silly to have a fenced area inside a fenced in yard IMO) or greenhouse. so all my ideas are fancy and unfulfilled. I hope that they all help you get crafty!.
 

300dutchman

Active member
im not much of a social scene person, i like flying under the radar, most people have no clue what i do and i like it that way, i love growing and all aspects of the process, form tirmming to extractions making seeds, the gorilla growing was definitely my favorite hobby, my bugs showed up today , 20 more min till the lights are on lol cant wait to get those bugs in there. here is a strain i made last year we call dirty phil. week 7 of flower, my cousin has a good friend who has original cuttings from romulan joe back in the day, he doesn't share though. one day when i move out of cul de sac living i will have a proper setup outside, and a shop for inside, 5 more years and i will be mortgage free and able to move around with the kids being on there own at that point.
 

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