Greenhouse growing in the Pacific NorthWest

Consider one possible alternative.

They actually make 100 gallon fabric pots/containers/beds (google 100 gallon fabric pot). There are two reasons I hear it recommended. One is these people use coco choir (the kind that looks like soil) and say you can just pull out the root ball and re-use the coco at the end of each harvest, leaving the 100 gallon container unmoved. Simply treat the coco with something to kill all the dead roots and flush out anything else. Secondly, in some medical states in the US where plant count is a concern a bed of plants is considered one root ball and therefore one plant. So, a one hundred gallon container with five plants would be one plant legally in some places.

I haven't grown this way personally but its something to think about.

All the best!
 

HHHG

Well-known member
Greenhouse within a greenhouse

I've decided to build a greenhouse on the covered patio with a kit like this...


It is 8'x12' and includes brackets and cut list.

It would be difficult to seal the entire patio and control the environment so I am going to wrap it with plastic to add another layer of warmth and hide the greenhouse within.

I'm still trying to decide what grow method to use. I'd like to setup a RDWC system but it will cost a lot more up front than soil. 20Gal soil pots are available locally for $10.
 

scrubdog

New member
I'm starting to rethink using soil for all the 20 Gallon plants. 6 plants per harvest times 3-4 harvests per year equals 360-480 gallons of soil. That's a LOT of work for me to do alone and even though I'm legal I don't feel comfortable letting anyone know about my garden.
I've tried everything from pure water culture, NFT, pumice, etc but now I only grow organic because it simply gives the best results always and the plants are healthier and taste natural. If you set your soil/compost mix up correctly then you don't change it every grow. Good compost soil just gets better and better and you only need add a bit more compost if you want. Usually it's the opposite problem... trying to control the growth.

In 50 years I have never seen anything beat good old fashioned compost for the best results with ANY plant. The secret to growing anything is to get the soil right. The highest tech growing system in the world will not beat good old fashioned compost for growing huge healthy plants of almost any species.

Just saying okay. It's not for everybody because you need to maintain an organic environment for constant decomposition and nitrogen fixation. This means bugs and worms for a proper organic factory to function correctly. This can be done in pots.

scrubdog
 

Cavedweller

New member
HHHG, I TOTALLY agree with Scrubdog. Do what you know, organic soil, climate controlled as much as is possible in your new environment. I wish you the best:):)
 

HHHG

Well-known member
I got some clear 6 mil plastic and plan to wrap the covered patio soon.

I've decided to get a cheap 12x7x7 poly/steel greenhouse for around $150 instead of the wood one I had planned. It will be enclosed in the patio so it doesn't need to be super strong and wind won't be a concern.
 
I`m glad you're prepping up for next season, my dream is to grow in a greenhouse (inspired by MNS) so I`ll be here learning and wishing you the best along the way.
 

jak straw

New member
you up in the PNW eh, folks be doing some amazing stuff in greenhouses here (including a member from this thread) good luck on the build and future OD grow, looks like a nice set up. Just remember to have air flow, I know a guy that lost most of his OD hoop house grow to mold this year, he didn't have any fans moving air just screens on both ends.
 
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HHHG

Well-known member
I still haven't built a greenhouse. I was going to a few months ago but was told my rental house was for sale so I abandoned the idea for this year.

I really hope to get the greenhouse going in 2015. I've done a lot of research and right now I'm looking at getting this shed kit from 2x4basics and leaving half of the roof and one whole side open to sunlight, basically the way it looks in the pic. Will that be enough light if it's facing south?

 
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HHHG

Well-known member
yeah take that top off. Why not use just the frame and wrap it with your poly?
That pic is just an example by the manufacturer of what can be done with the kit. I want to make it as secure as possible from wind and thieves so I'll at least have a wall on two sides with a locking door in one of the walls. I know it also has to be anchored to the ground.
 

Fated

Member
not to get too nerdy . . .

it will depend on your latitude, the angle of the roof, and the time of year . . .

you are probably good if it's south facing . . .

you may want to augment for length of day with a light on the inside, and be prepared for darkening options . . .

you will be set for year round with at least 2 harvests per year. may/will have to run a CO2 generator for heat in the winter, but it works 2 fold that way . . .

i would also insulate well . . .
 

Betterhaff

New member
I have some large windows (2.5 x 6 ft) that face south east and I grow plants by them all the time. They get plenty of light but I have to rotate them every once in a while. It doesn’t work well for flowering because interior lighting is difficult to control but they grow well for veg. I agree with Fated, the angles of the sun change with the different seasons.
 

HHHG

Well-known member
2015 looks irie

I'm thinking of building a pvc hoop house because it is cheap and can be torn down quickly.

I want to grow in organic dirt, but after the pest problems I had last year I am hesitant. I know Shanti gives his plants a weekly neem oil spray and I plan to do the same. He also uses
vaporized sulphur for mold/mildew. Any other organic ideas for keeping the bugs away?
 
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puppy

New member
You could consider trying mite predators. I've seen great results in tomato greenhouses using that.
 
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