CO2 for environmental control

Vlad the Inhaler

Active member
Hope everyone is well.
I read a bit about CO2 supplamentation and how it is a waste without light saturation.
Unless you are pushing up past 900ppfd, or there abouts, then you are wasting money.
That's true enough if you only look at yield.

I remember (misremember?) reading somewhere that when using CO2 you can run plants up to 90°f.
The higher the temp the more efficient light is, and also nutrients are more available, so you can dilute your fertigation, running a garden at 90° is more efficient than 80°.

Where I live the garden goes above 80° for almost half the year, even running lights only at night.
I need to use electricity to control my temps and bring them down to <85°.
If I can run the garden at 90°, with CO2, I have a lower power bill ( gunja is ilegal to grow here, so total power use is a security concern )

Does anyone know much about how CO2 supplamentation effects environmental requirements of the gunj?

Will running a garden above 30°c increase the risk of slimy ( Botrytis ) mould?

Thanks.
 

Islandgrower

Well-known member
Hope everyone is well.
I read a bit about CO2 supplamentation and how it is a waste without light saturation.
Unless you are pushing up past 900ppfd, or there abouts, then you are wasting money.
That's true enough if you only look at yield.

I remember (misremember?) reading somewhere that when using CO2 you can run plants up to 90°f.
The higher the temp the more efficient light is, and also nutrients are more available, so you can dilute your fertigation, running a garden at 90° is more efficient than 80°.

Where I live the garden goes above 80° for almost half the year, even running lights only at night.
I need to use electricity to control my temps and bring them down to <85°.
If I can run the garden at 90°, with CO2, I have a lower power bill ( gunja is ilegal to grow here, so total power use is a security concern )

Does anyone know much about how CO2 supplamentation effects environmental requirements of the gunj?

Will running a garden above 30°c increase the risk of slimy ( Botrytis ) mould?

Thanks.
I would think increasing air circulation Should prevent budrot. Even with higher humidity . Saw a thread where he flowers with higher humidity and he has numerous fans circulating the air. With higher temps you need to run higher humidity as well to keep vpd in check.
 

Vlad the Inhaler

Active member
I would think increasing air circulation Should prevent budrot. Even with higher humidity . Saw a thread where he flowers with higher humidity and he has numerous fans circulating the air. With higher temps you need to run higher humidity as well to keep vpd in check.
Thanks.
I've got good air circulation.
Also running a dehumidifier.
Just trying to work out if I run high LVL of CO2 ( 2500+ppm ) do the plants handle higher temps?
 

musashi

Site Moderator
Staff member
Some varieties and phenotypes within may handle higher temps better than others. Supplements like silicates, yucca, etc. can help in maintaining cellular water retention, increased cell integrity, continued metabolism, surface protection. These as well as UV spectrum can have a suppressive effect against molds I would think. Don't forget to social distance them lol.

🤙 Mu
 

quinxstar

Well-known member
they always say co2 is polluttion (COP21) is fault because more you have co2 more you have big harvest
 

quinxstar

Well-known member
Hope everyone is well.
I read a bit about CO2 supplamentation and how it is a waste without light saturation.
Unless you are pushing up past 900ppfd, or there abouts, then you are wasting money.
That's true enough if you only look at yield.

I remember (misremember?) reading somewhere that when using CO2 you can run plants up to 90°f.
The higher the temp the more efficient light is, and also nutrients are more available, so you can dilute your fertigation, running a garden at 90° is more efficient than 80°.

Where I live the garden goes above 80° for almost half the year, even running lights only at night.
I need to use electricity to control my temps and bring them down to <85°.
If I can run the garden at 90°, with CO2, I have a lower power bill ( gunja is ilegal to grow here, so total power use is a security concern )

Does anyone know much about how CO2 supplamentation effects environmental requirements of the gunj?

Will running a garden above 30°c increase the risk of slimy ( Botrytis ) mould?

Thanks.

i think is not a temperature problem but you have to use it when the light is open and can be dangerous (gaz)

i never take the risk to use it but you can double you havest with co2

i had no expeerience with that
 

Islandgrower

Well-known member
So does Vpd not come into play in flower as well . Higher temps means higher humidity to stay in the zone. Which in turn would lead to higher yields as well.
 

musashi

Site Moderator
Staff member
Good info @CannaFish. As usual, you offer that something extra brah! While VPD is not regularly talked about, it certainly has to be considered when dialing in your environment. While I see merit using LED's, I am still ignorant but happy to accomplish what I do with 'old' technology. I agree with @PlantManBee's words, there are many ways to skin a cat.

...an indoor grower can adjust their environment to achieve optimal growing conditions. Controlled environments allow growers to maintain optimal temperatures, carbon dioxide concentrations, light intensity and relative humidity...

Indoors, environment is everything. I have looked at CO2 usage in the past but have no need to incur the additional cost/hassle because I'm not growing for the yield, i.e. money. I considered sealed rooms, 220v, splits, CMH and LED, filtration systems, etc. Always something as the sky is the limit. I keep it simple, as I do it for love not money. Many of us can meet our needs just focusing on light, heat, temperature and humidity. If it ain't broke...

"...In contrast, the leaves of plants under the HPS lamps showed a wide range of internal temperatures; the highest temps were apparent at the top of the canopy and lowest internal leaf temperatures were at the bottom of the canopy. This partially explains why HPS lamps produce top-heavy crops while LED lighting creates a more uniform canopy..."

This can be ameliorated by adding LED lighting to the sides for an overall heavier crop using both forms of lighting, with the additional LED lighting increasing cost slightly. Nothing beats outdoors though :)

"...an increase in the ambient room temperature of 5-7°C in LED-lit rooms relative to temperatures in HPS grow rooms is necessary to achieve similar internal leaf temperatures and plant growth rates as those experienced by plants in HPS-lit rooms..."

That's 40 degrees if I read that right,. In warmer climes, LED's make sense. In colder climes, seems plants can benefit from the heat of HPS. How do you increase heat in colder climes without substantially adding to net cost? I actually heat most of the house for half of the year routing the heat sucked out of the grow room through the filtration system and into the living room. Net, net, I have negated much of my costs as I rarely use gas heating during the winter months anymore. Filtered air into the house too!

They say it takes money to make money. I am glad I don't have to chase it when it comes to growing my favorite medicine ;). Now, what to do with the soil prices doubling this year. Grrrr!

🤙 Mu
 

Vlad the Inhaler

Active member
you down wit VPD?

The Importance of CO2 Enhancement for High-Temperature Growing
Increasing CO2 concentrations will extend the temperature range in which RuBisCO may fix CO2 into sugar. With increased CO2 we see that as temperature increases, so does the rate of the chemical reaction that RuBisCO performs. This works because an increase in CO2 concentration means that the ratio of chemical substrates to products is being increased. If the CO2 concentrations are increased from ambient 300ppm to 1500ppm, the change in the ratio of reactants to products will allow plants to continue to fix CO2 into sucrose at leaf temperatures well above 27°C, all the way up to about 36°C! (see Figure 1)



And as the temperature increases, so does the rate of carbon fixation and plant growth. This means that if growers are careful with their environmental controls, they may achieve very high rates of carbon fixation and plant growth at leaf temperatures well above 30°C.


Thanks for the biscuit
 
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