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  #1  
Old 06-08-2011, 03:33 PM
Yosemite Sam's Avatar
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Default Tripod plants?

Hi guys,
I just popped a couple of beans and one of the seedlings that came out has a triple leaf set...
Thought i'd share some pics of this one...
It's a nev haze.



The one front right






Maybe it holds some special genetics that makes one much higher then the average NevHz....
Can't wait to sex it and give it a go.


Oh i almost forgot,... this one is also a beauty

Mango Haze with giant leafs




Nice no?

YS
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  #2  
Old 06-09-2011, 01:01 PM
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Cool structure.

FYI, the correct term is triploid for that condition.

Those are some big ol leaves too
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  #3  
Old 06-09-2011, 01:18 PM
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Hi MJ,
Triploid, got it!
Thanks
YS
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  #4  
Old 06-09-2011, 05:24 PM
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Sorry MJ, not trying to be an arse here, but triploid may or maynot be the correct term for that plant. There is no way of knowing without doing a lab test on it. Haploid refers to a single set of chromosomes, diploid refers to the normal state of 2 sets of chromosomes, and triploid refers to a state of having 3 sets. The 3 leaves per node thing may or may not be a triploid, but simply having 3 leaves is no guarantee of that. There is some debate still about how to refer to these things, personally I always use the term trifoliar (3 leaves). It would seem that the trait is linked to a higher than normal rate of auxin production coupled with an additional gene for the production of leaves.
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  #5  
Old 06-10-2011, 01:33 PM
coop
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wholed politaxl? is the corerct term for a trifolate plant

tripliods can only be made crossing a polyploid to a diploid.

You could take a normal plant hit it with a mutagen, then take the polyploid seedlings and backcross to a diploid parent for a triploid offspring.
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Old 06-10-2011, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GMT View Post
Sorry MJ, not trying to be an arse here, but triploid may or maynot be the correct term for that plant. There is no way of knowing without doing a lab test on it. Haploid refers to a single set of chromosomes, diploid refers to the normal state of 2 sets of chromosomes, and triploid refers to a state of having 3 sets. The 3 leaves per node thing may or may not be a triploid, but simply having 3 leaves is no guarantee of that. There is some debate still about how to refer to these things, personally I always use the term trifoliar (3 leaves). It would seem that the trait is linked to a higher than normal rate of auxin production coupled with an additional gene for the production of leaves.
My bad... Thanks for the correction and I'll try to remember this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by coop View Post
wholed politaxl? is the corerct term for a trifolate plant

tripliods can only be made crossing a polyploid to a diploid.

You could take a normal plant hit it with a mutagen, then take the polyploid seedlings and backcross to a diploid parent for a triploid offspring.
"Whorled Phyllotaxy" I believe is what you were trying to type. We wanna end the "politaxi" due to the oppression it causes. LMAO JK
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Old 06-10-2011, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coop View Post
wholed politaxl? is the corerct term for a trifolate plant

tripliods can only be made crossing a polyploid to a diploid.

You could take a normal plant hit it with a mutagen, then take the polyploid seedlings and backcross to a diploid parent for a triploid offspring.
While its true that the term Whorled Phyllotaxy can be used to describe these plants, its also confusing. For instance that term can be used to describe trifoliars, quadrafoliars and pentafoliars, and there'd be no way of knowing which you were talking about. Simply using the number within the name however allows instant knowledge of what it is that were discussing.
Yes triploids can be created by crossing a tetraploid to a diploid, however that isn't the only method by which they occur. In 0.5% of cases, (1 in 200), the diploid cells don't split into haploids at the point of meiosis, and a diploid is combined with the haploid of the other parent, creating a triploid. In mamals this results in a miscarraige, in plants however this is not the case. In 0.25% of cases, (1 in 400 seeds), a diploid sex cell will meet a diploid sex cell, and create a tetraploid. These plants are reported to be much healthier and more vigorous than diploid plants, but by looking at them with the naked eye, you wouldn't be able to tell if they were diploid, triploids or tetraploids.
Trifoliar

Quadrafoliar

Pentafoliar

all can be refered to as carrying the Whorled Phyllotaxy trait.
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  #8  
Old 06-10-2011, 10:33 PM
coop
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polyploids have to do with chromosome number not leaft count.
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Old 06-11-2011, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coop View Post
polyploids have to do with chromosome number not leaft count.
yeah, hi coop, that's the point i made in my first post in this thread. The pics are for the purpose of discussing the problem you have with the term trifoliar. I also included a quick explanation on other ways triploids and tetraploids are formed. I had hoped that the post would explain itself, I guess I was wrong.
It's my belief that all of the above pics are from diploid plants.

Last edited by GMT; 06-11-2011 at 12:14 AM.
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  #10  
Old 06-11-2011, 02:57 AM
coop
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yes i understand

but triplods are not found that in nature to often,

Polyploids yes, but to get triploids you need to breed for them.
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