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  #1  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:01 PM
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Default Can neem be used in late bloom?

I've got a few gnats and I was thinking of using neem or azmax on roots 0.4% before I start final flush.
Is there any chance using neem this late on roots only can effect final product?
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  #2  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:39 PM
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I would avoid the application of neem this late. Use sticky traps instead, they work just as well for gnat control. Neem can burn even diluted and has an unpleasant odor which late in flower could affect the final taste, cure, high. I have tried various gnat control methods and sticky traps seem to work best in active infestations.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:44 PM
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Thumbs down Neem is uncureable

What sysadmin said, just scratch that option latestagebloom.
Maybe something mild like Cannacure?
Good luck with them - put up a electric bugzapper, gives of UV light.

edit: Correct usage of UVb: 15-30minutes per day last two weeks of bloom

Last edited by PatientZero; 05-21-2017 at 04:04 PM.
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  #4  
Old 02-17-2017, 04:27 AM
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Thanks I'll skip neem this late in bloom.
I thought the little bastards were gone but I have about 5 per container.
Revenge fly sticks I came across last visit at home gardening center and they are easy to work with.They come in 10,24 and 48in long strips and can be cut up easy without messing up sizziors.
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  #5  
Old 05-21-2017, 05:31 AM
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You can use neem right up to harvest, just depends how you use it. Instead of spraying, add the appropriate amount of mixed neem to your water reservoir just before using and give the girls a good drink. The plant will absorb the neem through its roots system and then any bug sucking into it is doomed. Works great. If you do this once a week as a preventative there's no need to spray at all. Good cold pressed neem works the best.

To mix use warm water,
Mix the appropriate amount of warm water to soap
Then slowly add the oil while stirring vigorously and you're good to go.
Use within the next few hours as it will go off.
I've used it right up to harvest like this and couldn't detest any unusual taste.
I remember reading somewhere that neem's most bug killing active ingredient azadirachtin is removed from non cold pressed neem products to increase shelf life, so cold pressed is the go. Only takes a few minutes to mix.
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  #6  
Old 05-22-2017, 07:54 AM
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I am a huge fan of Neem oil (all forms) I have used Neem up to harvest time, but on outdoor grows where UV in sunlight breaks down the Neem oil pretty fast. Like in a day or two.

Neem oil comes from the seeds of Azadirachta indica, or Neem tree. Raw neem oil is pressed or extracted from the seeds. Then it is sold raw, or processed into two other products. One is Azadirachtin. Azadirachtin is removed from raw neem oil by adding alcohol and the azadirachtin dissipates out. Azadirachtin is a good root absorbed plant systemic, a rather weak leaf absorbed systemic, and is also effective through direct contact. It is a good soil drench as well. Azadirachtin is a triterpinoid and is an effective insect and mite growth regulator. It has a half life of 2-4 days in water, and about 1 day on leaves exposed to light. Some guys complain online that they are allergic to it, but I do not understand that with such a short half life. *shrug*

Typically the oil that is left after the azadirachtin is removed is called "neem oil", "clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil", "Neem oil Extract", "Neem oil concentrate" or "70% neem oil." They remove the azadirachtin for several reasons, one being that they extract the azadirachtin for use in pesticides and miticides. Clarified hydrophobic neem oil is thinner that raw Neem oil, and mixes easier with water and is easier to apply in sprays. This is because azadirachtin is not very water soluble. Clarified neem oil works like ag or mineral oil in suffocating insects and mites by coating them in oil so that they cannot breathe. It is also a very effective against PM.

Raw neem retains the azadirachtin and the neem oil. It is harder to mix with water than refined neem oil. However, raw neem retains the root pathway systemic azadirachtin, as well as the azadirachtin and oil foliar contact spray effectiveness for dealing with insects, mites and PM.
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Last edited by Big Sur; 05-22-2017 at 08:01 AM.
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  #7  
Old 05-22-2017, 04:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Sur View Post
I am a huge fan of Neem oil (all forms) I have used Neem up to harvest time, but on outdoor grows where UV in sunlight breaks down the Neem oil pretty fast. Like in a day or two.

Neem oil comes from the seeds of Azadirachta indica, or Neem tree. Raw neem oil is pressed or extracted from the seeds. Then it is sold raw, or processed into two other products. One is Azadirachtin. Azadirachtin is removed from raw neem oil by adding alcohol and the azadirachtin dissipates out. Azadirachtin is a good root absorbed plant systemic, a rather weak leaf absorbed systemic, and is also effective through direct contact. It is a good soil drench as well. Azadirachtin is a triterpinoid and is an effective insect and mite growth regulator. It has a half life of 2-4 days in water, and about 1 day on leaves exposed to light. Some guys complain online that they are allergic to it, but I do not understand that with such a short half life. *shrug*

Typically the oil that is left after the azadirachtin is removed is called "neem oil", "clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil", "Neem oil Extract", "Neem oil concentrate" or "70% neem oil." They remove the azadirachtin for several reasons, one being that they extract the azadirachtin for use in pesticides and miticides. Clarified hydrophobic neem oil is thinner that raw Neem oil, and mixes easier with water and is easier to apply in sprays. This is because azadirachtin is not very water soluble. Clarified neem oil works like ag or mineral oil in suffocating insects and mites by coating them in oil so that they cannot breathe. It is also a very effective against PM.

Raw neem retains the azadirachtin and the neem oil. It is harder to mix with water than refined neem oil. However, raw neem retains the root pathway systemic azadirachtin, as well as the azadirachtin and oil foliar contact spray effectiveness for dealing with insects, mites and PM.
Great information.
I was using Azmax foliar and root drench on first application,then just root drench.
I seen results using both ways but I had swarms of fungus gnats.
Have you had better results applying foliarly or as a root drench ?
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  #8  
Old 05-23-2017, 10:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Sur View Post
I am a huge fan of Neem oil (all forms) I have used Neem up to harvest time, but on outdoor grows where UV in sunlight breaks down the Neem oil pretty fast. Like in a day or two.

Neem oil comes from the seeds of Azadirachta indica, or Neem tree. Raw neem oil is pressed or extracted from the seeds. Then it is sold raw, or processed into two other products. One is Azadirachtin. Azadirachtin is removed from raw neem oil by adding alcohol and the azadirachtin dissipates out. Azadirachtin is a good root absorbed plant systemic, a rather weak leaf absorbed systemic, and is also effective through direct contact. It is a good soil drench as well. Azadirachtin is a triterpinoid and is an effective insect and mite growth regulator. It has a half life of 2-4 days in water, and about 1 day on leaves exposed to light. Some guys complain online that they are allergic to it, but I do not understand that with such a short half life. *shrug*

Typically the oil that is left after the azadirachtin is removed is called "neem oil", "clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil", "Neem oil Extract", "Neem oil concentrate" or "70% neem oil." They remove the azadirachtin for several reasons, one being that they extract the azadirachtin for use in pesticides and miticides. Clarified hydrophobic neem oil is thinner that raw Neem oil, and mixes easier with water and is easier to apply in sprays. This is because azadirachtin is not very water soluble. Clarified neem oil works like ag or mineral oil in suffocating insects and mites by coating them in oil so that they cannot breathe. It is also a very effective against PM.

Raw neem retains the azadirachtin and the neem oil. It is harder to mix with water than refined neem oil. However, raw neem retains the root pathway systemic azadirachtin, as well as the azadirachtin and oil foliar contact spray effectiveness for dealing with insects, mites and PM.
Hey, lots of good info there. I did a quick check on a popular commercial neem product called Eco-Neem and they say that because azadirachtin is unstable and breaks down in 3-6 months, they remove it and add other plant oils.
I get around cold pressed neems short life by keeping it in the fridge. First I let it warm and liquefy and then add to jars for easy access later on. It goes solid in the fridge and I use a spoon to remove the desired amount. Seems to last for years this way.
About Eco-neemŽ Organic Insecticide | Noosa Gardener
Cheers
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  #9  
Old 05-24-2017, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indi View Post
Great information.
I was using Azmax foliar and root drench on first application,then just root drench.
I seen results using both ways but I had swarms of fungus gnats.
Have you had better results applying foliarly or as a root drench ?
Generally I use Neem as a preventative spray, but if spider mites, thrips or whitefly show up I spray and drench.
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  #10  
Old 05-24-2017, 10:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippy View Post
Hey, lots of good info there. I did a quick check on a popular commercial neem product called Eco-Neem and they say that because azadirachtin is unstable and breaks down in 3-6 months, they remove it and add other plant oils.
I get around cold pressed neems short life by keeping it in the fridge. First I let it warm and liquefy and then add to jars for easy access later on. It goes solid in the fridge and I use a spoon to remove the desired amount. Seems to last for years this way.
About Eco-neemŽ Organic Insecticide | Noosa Gardener
Cheers
Back at ya. I generally buy raw neem by the half gallon online in the spring and I use it on my bamboos and other ornamentals here on my property in summer, which is also when I grow weed outdoors. Neem is most effective in warmer temps. I started using Neem as a preventative for bamboo spider mites on my bamboos here, which are impossible to control or contain if they take hold. They do not like the smell of Neem, apparently. I also have to resort to using Avid and Talstar on my bamboo if I see any signs of bamboo mites. The birds bring the mites in here randomly some years. I usually only have enough Neem around for the summer months, when it is most effective.

I may use the refer method to store raw Neem longer if I buy it in larger quantities (1 to 2.5 gallon size) in future though. That is a good idea. What I have read though is that azadirachtin is highly photo-sensitive, and it breaks down rapidly with any exposure to light. It also breaks down if exposed to water. So I keep it (and all my pesticides) covered and dry in a plastic tub with a lid on it in the cool garage.
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