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Old 02-24-2011, 06:24 PM
Ras Ras is offline
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Lightbulb Companion planting for health rather than stealth

I am looking to do an outdoor guerilla style grow that I won't be able to visit often, so I am looking to recruit an army of helpers against disease.

In my fruit+vege garden I have been using some companion planting methods to try to increase the health of my soil and to attract friendly insects. There are some plants that truly do extremely well together and some that simply cannot abide. This is because of some microbiological wizardry that maybe I will understand some minute speck of someday, but for now I just want to plant my cannabis with other plants that are gonna grow up with them like a good older brother - keeping lil sis healthy and badass strong!

So far my research has been guided by using the trusty tomato plant as a marijuana analogue, and the knowledge that MJ likes to grow with strongly aromatic plants, however I have not been able to put ANY of these pairings below to test with cannabis in a natural setting. Yet.

I would love if any of you have experiences to add, let's get our heads together and break into this untapped arsenal!

BASIL - In testing my tomato plants I found that growing with basil helps them grow quick! From my tiny (and inconclusive) test, the tomatoes surrounded by basil outperformed the others by an easy 25%. The fruit set and flavour is good but not perceptibly different VS non basil side of planter. Basil is prettymuch unaffected by insects - they avoid it and the plants nearby. Basil itself tastes amazing - it is a hardy grower and a standby herb in the garden.

TARRAGON - Another little herb that I love is tarragon - not so hardy in itself but grows happily enough with decent soil and sunshine. Tarragon is said to repel pests, plus it's pretty and tastes excellent with fish and subtle tasting dishes. I havn't had pest problems with the plants around the tarragon, but then again the whole planter is chocked full of various herbs so who knows?

MINT - The tomatoes love growing with the mints and I love growing them. They are aromatic and are in fact said to repel slugs and insects, including aphids. This may be especially useful in a nursery where seedlings are vulnerable? Mint leaves are a known anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. I don't know that this would translate into those properties being transferred into the soil rhizosphere though, but mint grows so quickly that it is necessary to prune it often - and where better to put the clippings than back to the soil as mulch! Plus mint tea is amazing, and the flavour is so intense when freshly picked. Plant it within the pot under the ground, so that all you have to deal with in terms of invasiveness is the adventitious roots which are easy to swipe and end up tasting good...

GARLIC - major helper in the garden, plus it tastes so good I eat it until the gf compains about the smell... here is what ghorganics.com has to say about garlic, and I do not disagree with anything:
Quote:
GARLIC: Plant near roses to repel aphids. It also benefits apple trees, pear trees, cucumbers, peas, lettuce and celery. Plant under peach trees to help repel borers. Garlic accumulates sulfur: a naturally occurring fungicide which will help in the garden with disease prevention. Garlic is systemic in action as it is taken up by the plants through their pores and when garlic tea is used as a soil drench it is also taken up by the plant roots. It has value in offending codling moths, Japanese beetles, root maggots, snails, and carrot root fly. Researchers have observed that time-released garlic capsules planted at the bases of fruit trees actually kept deer away. It's certainly worth a try! Concentrated garlic sprays have been observed to repel and kill whiteflies, aphids and fungus gnats among others with as little as a 6-8% concentration!
Garlic is a great ingredient to a natural anti-insect spray. It grows hardy and is friends with the tomatoes.

SAGE - not growing so hardily in my garden - never took off. Apparently sage is good against the slugs and worms.

PEPPERS - still small and in veg (2-3 ft), but apart from being aphid bait, they are really happy with the tomatoes. If planting these watch out for ANTS running up and down the stem - they are cultivating aphids, those crafty buggers. Peppers are also awesome in sprays.

AVOID
- all leaf crops - will attract the kind of attention you do not want. Even arugula, despite the spicy taste, is a no-no.

- BRASSICAS - Nightshades (tomato etc) do not like these, and they don't look as if I want them near buds for fear of insect invasion.


Well that's it for the while, I hope that with our combined knowledge we can add to this list and tweak with some real testing. I must add that monocropping any crop is asking mother nature for a fight, it has been seen for ages that disease flourishes in monocropped plots, and humans have been vainly fighting for ages... let's get mother nature on our side again

Peace and love
- Ras
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:27 PM
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NICE!

Thanks for the info Ras.
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Old 02-25-2011, 05:54 PM
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Hey there Ras,

My lone lady in the pic has surrounding it, Basil, lemongrass, eshallots, eggplants, tarragon, peppers and artichokes...Never had a problem with this lady...no noticeable pest problem, no pesticides...

PHM
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Old 02-25-2011, 06:04 PM
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Thanks. I've got a list of these saved somewhere. Have to look them up again.
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:57 AM
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Here's some notes I jotted down from various places. Not very organized. I put down heights so you can know how much cover they will bring. The Shasta daisy would be good to hide plants. I think if you use flowers to hide plants the guys in choppers won't be able to see them. They'll see the flowers but not the rest.

List of companion plants
From Wikipedia
List of companion plants - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1.borage-grows to a height of 60-100 cm (2.0–3.3 ft)-Borage is used in companion planting.[5] It is said to protect or nurse legumes, spinach, brassicas, and even strawberries.[6] It is also said to be a good companion plant to tomatoes because it confuses the search image of the mother moths of tomato hornworms or manduca looking for a place to lay their eggs.[7] Claims that it improves tomato growth [8] and makes them taste better [9] remain unsubstantiated. Borage is the magic bullet of companion plants.
Borage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
2.(From someone else)i had basil and mint close to my plants during the last grow. it seemed to help a lot in controlling spider mites, but it didnt solve the problem completly. for this grow i will grow mint and basil in the same pot, around the stem of my mother plant. The spider mites are very problematic around here.
3.?garlic keep pests away, same with marigold
4. From cannibusculture-The main companion plant that has attracted interest with underground marijuana researchers is stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) which has been said to increase essential oils in many plants
5.chamomile-chamomile be grown as a companion plant for cannabis because chamomile increases the production of “oils and resins” of the herb plants it grows near to.
Chamomile and marijuana!!
Grows to a height of 15-60 cm.
6.ALFALFA: Perennial that roots deeply. Fixes the soil with nitrogen, accumulates iron, magnesium, phosphorous and potassium. Withstands droughts with it's long taproot and can improve just about any soil! Alfalfa has the ability to break up hard clay soil and can even send its' roots through rocks! Now that is a tenacious plant! Alfalfa is practically pest and disease free. It needs only natural rainfall to survive.
7.BEANS: All bean enrich the soil with nitrogen fixed form the air. In general they are good company for carrots, celery, chards, corn, eggplant, peas, potatoes, brassicas, beets, radish, strawberry and cucumbers. Beans are great for heavy nitrogen users like corn and grain plants because beans fix nitrogen from the air into the soil so the nitrogen used up by the corn and grains are replaced at the end of the season when the bean plants die back. French Haricot beans, sweet corn and melons are a good combo. Summer savory deters bean beetles and improves growth and flavor. Keep beans away from the alliums.
8.Lovage tall (3 to 9 ft) perennial
9.Datura-What struck me is that out of the dozens upon dozens of various herbs I have growing... datura is the one that I have that I never have to pick off caterpillars. Never have I seen ANY aphid or spider mite on it.
10.garlic-i can confirm from personal experience that lettuce and garlice will both keep pest away
11.tarragon-The scent and taste of tarragon is disliked by many garden pests, making it useful for intercropping as a companion plant, to protect its gardenmates. It is also reputed to be a nurse plant, enhancing growth and flavor of companion crops
Tarragon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
12.White Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)-Yarrow is considered an especially useful companion plant, not only repelling some bad insects while attracting good, predatory ones, but also improving soil quality.[citation needed] It attracts predatory wasps, which drink the nectar and then use insect pests as food for their larvae. Similarly, it attracts ladybugs and hoverflies. Its leaves are thought to be good fertilizer, and a beneficial additive for compost.
It is also considered directly beneficial to other plants, improving the health of sick plants when grown near them.
14.Lovage(Levisticum officinale)-Is thought to improve the health of almost all plants, like borage and geraniums, is considered a "magic bullet" of companion planting.

2.Chamomile Seeds - Matricaria Recutita - .03 Grams - Approx 200 Gardening grows to a height of 15-60 cm
chamomile be grown as a companion plant for cannabis because chamomile increases the production of “oils and resins” of the herb plants it grows near to.
Chamomile and marijuana!!
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Old 02-26-2011, 03:25 PM
Ras Ras is offline
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That is what I wanted to see - some pixellated proof!
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificHighwayman View Post
Hey there Ras,

My lone lady in the pic has surrounding it, Basil, lemongrass, eshallots, eggplants, tarragon, peppers and artichokes...Never had a problem with this lady...no noticeable pest problem, no pesticides...

PHM
Pacific, your girl does look healthy and badass strong! I love how the leaves just seem to crane for the light - I think that is a lovely looking plant, and sweet grow spot too



Quote:
Originally Posted by coop View Post
i was doing some reading about growing ginger and came across this site
and was discussing with a friend the other day how it seems like the ideal companion plant.
Why I Grow Ginger - QUANTUM AGRICULTURE
coop, ginger looks like a massive candidate, thanks! From checking it out online, it looks like it doesn't need more attention than being in good soil, low wind and semi-shaded. Ginger is easy to start from bulbs - soak in water overnight, locate meristems/buds, place them facing upwards in the soil in conditions in the goldilocks zone that you know well from prior experience and let her do her thing.

MJPassion you are most welcome, I'm glad this appeals to you too.

By the way when I started searching for all these herbs and stuff google was throwing out lots of recipes and shit...
If you want to ensure that your results do NOT contain a certain word, just put a negative sign in front of it: 'ginger companion plant -recipe'. As Oscar posted, the wiki entry on companion planting is expansive and a great place to start looking at the effects of the various plants.

Datura... I don't think I want her in my garden, she is a bit sinister to my eyes...

CHAMOMILE - I had no germ from the 2 small seed packs that I bought. I would love to add these to any garden though.

Forgot to add: LEMONBALM - never has any insect problems, leaves can actually be used as anti-mosquito... Really similar to mint in most other aspects tho. Grows hardily, good companion.

I really like growing a variety of plants - fruits, vege's and herbs - I think that we are far removed from the process of food production, and with today's world that worries me greatly! In my country, the average age of a farmer is 60 years old... it is becoming scarily close in some places to losing a massive store of knowledge that has been nurtured through the generations on literally how to produce food. It is not there yet, but the trend is long begun. I respect my endeavours a lot more that they are not just growing for smoke.

Out to the garden...
EZ
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Last edited by Ras; 02-26-2011 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 10-09-2014, 10:51 PM
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I am convinced -but not sure- coniferes (pines) might help against mold via air. Unfortunately I could not find any proof of this. The reason for my conviction is I never had any mold while I live in a high RH area and the coniferes around my garden are the only explanation I can think of.

Of course I do have a little theory
You get the mold if the moisture is high. What may happen then is the plants get a higher negative charge attracting the mold that has a positive load. Because of the pointy needles nothing gets a higher charge than coniferes (pines), so they attract all the mold and effectively destroy it thanks to the massive amounts of pinenes they release if the electric stress gets high.

From all the theory it should also increase THC, which in itself is another repellant.
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Old 12-29-2016, 09:41 AM
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thanks a lot for this review! follow Useful Properties Of Strawberries and check some properties of strawberries that can help your organism!
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Old 12-30-2016, 02:24 AM
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first off great thread Ras...much appreciated. I suppose we all have done a bit of pondering and research re the companion thing and I think it is very cool to have it in one spot here...
PHM... they love the eggplant aye? same here ..couple hundy Ks north. Very nice plant brother and all the best for the finish. I'm reading much re No-till and slowly working into the 'system'...fascinating stuff and seeing it in practice (pertaining to companions and stuff) really makes me smile.

All good things and thanks for the thread Ras and all posters
Vinnno
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Old 12-30-2016, 05:14 AM
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Hi Ras, cool thread.
Can I ask do you have any specefic pest or disease problem you are worried about in your area?
Or you just looking at possible relationships?
Another approach, when bush farming is to use very hardy yet low yielding strains.
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